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Featured Specialty Crop – Cabbage (Green)

 

 

 

 

Cabbage History & Trivia

Green cabbage, botanical name Brassica oleracea or B. oleracea var. capitata, is a hard-heading cabbage and one of three distinct cabbage types within the Brassica family. The word “cabbage” is an Anglicized form of the French caboche, meaning “head.”

The Celts of central and western Europe played a direct role in the distribution and popularization of cabbage as a food plant. Although the evidence points to the eastern Mediterranean and Asia Minor as the place of origin of the species, Celtic knowledge of it was so ancient as to have influenced the Latin name, Brassica (from the Celtic word bresic, meaning “cabbage”).

The hard-heading cabbages were developed in the cooler parts of Europe by peoples largely Celtic, Nordic, or of mixed blood and culture involving Celtic or Nordic peoples. The round-headed form is the oldest of the hard types of cabbage and is the only one described first during the 16th century, wild cabbage was brought to Europe around 600 B.C. by groups of Celtic wanderers.

 

Why is Cabbage So Good For You?

Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C, folate, manganese, vitamin K, and vitamin B6. It also contains some potassium, iron, and phosphorus.

 

What does it look/taste like?

Green cabbage has tightly enveloped superimposed pale green leaves, with variations of pea green colorings. Their thick, broad, deeply veined and waxy in their finish. The flavor of Green cabbage is grassy, sweet and cruciferous, a trademark characteristic of cabbage.

 

How do you eat it?

  • Green cabbage can be utilized both raw and cooked. It is often found in salad mixes and braising green mixes. Salad mixes are the perfect opportunity to showcase Green cabbage’s texture and flavor alongside other varying flavors and textures.

  • Green cabbage can be wilted, braised, roasted, fried, dehydrated, grilled and juiced.

  • It pairs well with rich ingredients such as pork, cream, melting, aged and blue cheeses, butter, eggs, olive oil avocados and nuts.

  • Other companion ingredients include citrus, mango, chiles, garlic, shelling beans, farro, sausages, mushrooms, ginger, fennel, shallots and light-bodied vinegars.

Information Courtesy of specialtyproduce.com

 

 

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